Dr. Leonard (Lenny) Grob

Dr. Leonard (Lenny) Grob is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Fairleigh Dickinson. His expertise lies in the areas of philosophy of dialogue, Holocaust Studies, and ethical issues pertinent to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. As a member of an NGO committed to resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, he currently brings peace proposals to ambassadors and their deputies at UN missions. Among Lenny’s publications are the edited volumes entitled Anguished Hope: Holocaust Scholars Confront the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict and Encountering the Stranger: A Jewish-Christian-Muslim Trialogue.

Related Courses

Abraham Joshua Heschel: Activist Rabbi

Many Americans familiar with the name Abraham Joshua Heschel have come to know that name primarily through the iconic photograph of Heschel walking alongside Martin Luther King in Selma. He is remembered as an activist who happened to be a rabbi. Fewer of us are aware of Heschel’s philosophical and theological writings, and many fail to see the linkage between his writings on relationship with God and a call to social action on behalf of civil rights and peace. This session will explore this connection, showing how Heschel’s theology provides the necessary moral basis for his activism.


2.3.3 Does Human Nature Boil Down to Self-Interest?

The way individuals have responded to the current pandemic sheds light on one of the main divides in our society. Some see human nature dictating that we act solely according to our self-interest; others see regard for the welfare of others – altruism – as a key motivation for our actions. Guided by the philosophies of two twentieth century thinkers, Martin Buber and Emmanuel Levinas, as well by a recounting of the deeds of Christian rescuers during the Holocaust, we will explore a perennial philosophical question: Is human nature intrinsically self-interested? New!


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 3

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 1

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 2

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Israel And Palestine: Thoughts On Healing The Divide

This course will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. NEW!


Rescuers During the Holocaust: What They Can Teach Us About Human Nature?

Christian rescuers during the Holocaust engaged in acts that put their own lives and the lives of their families in mortal danger. During this talk, Lenny will explore the implications of these altruistic acts for our understanding of “human nature.” He’ll be relying, in part, on interviews he conducted with rescuers during a visit to Germany.