Alice Twombly

Alice Twombly has a B.A. in English from Brandeis and an M.A.T. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She taught Shakespeare and AP English at Teaneck H.S. for over 35 years. An educational consultant, photographer, and poet, Alice frequently lectures on literary topics at regional libraries, is the Curator of Thursdays Are For Poetry, a monthly poetry reading in Teaneck, and a member of Brevitas, an online poetry collective of over 70 poets in the NY Metro Area.

Related Courses

War’s Consequences: Two Short Stories by Ernest Hemingway

We will study “In Another Country” and “Soldier’s Home.” Here are the links: https://www.somanybooks.org/eng208/SoldiersHome.pdf and       https://mt15000219.schoolwires.net/cms/lib/MT15000219/Centricity/Domain/97/In%20Another%20Country.pdf. Please read the stories before class.


Black Lives Matter  

African American poets examine race through the lens of powerful poems. These poems are listed in order of publication. Each of these is downloadable using Google, but here are suggested links for each poem.
1. “I, Too” by Langston Hughes 1926 www.poetryfoundation.org
2. “Southern Cop” by Sterling A. Brown 1936 www.poemhunter.com
3. “we real cool” by Gwendolyn Brooks 1960 www.poetryfoundation.org
4. “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden 1962 www.poetryfoundation.org
5. “Facing It” by Yusef Komunyakaa 1988 www.poetryfoundation.org
6. “Incident” by Natasha Tretheway 2006 www.poetryfoundation.org
If we have time for it:
7. “Praise Song for the Day”, Elizabeth Alexander 2009 www.poetryfoundation.org (Written for President Barack Obama’s Inauguration, Jan 20, 2009.)


The American Renaissance: Walt Whitman

“The American Renaissance” (1840–1870) is the name given the period when America’s first literary giants emerged. Herman Melville and Walt Whitman, who defined American individualism, created their epic works mid-century: Moby Dick in 1850, and the first edition of Leaves of Grass in 1855. In this class, we will read Whitman’s Civil War poems from the later editions of Leaves of Grass: “Drum Taps” and “Memories of President Lincoln. (In class 1.3.6, above, we will study Melville’s Moby Dick.) You can take both courses or just one.


The American Renaissance: Herman Melville

“The American Renaissance” (1840–1870) is the name given to the period when America’s first literary giants emerged. Herman Melville and Walt Whitman, who defined American individualism, created their epic works mid-century: Moby Dick in 1850, and the first edition of Leaves of Grass in 1855. In this class, we will study Melville’s Moby Dick (In class 2.2.6, see below, we will read Whitman’s Civil War poems from the later editions of Leaves of Grass:  “Drum Taps” and “Memories of President Lincoln.”) You can take both courses or just one.