The Winter 2022 Courses span a wide range of interest for our community. You will be able to attend four full days of classes for the extremely low fee of $60 per student.

You do not have to register for individual classes in advance. Register once and, on presentation days, log on to the classes that interest you.  Students receive the Zoom links in a reminder email on Monday before each Tuesday session. 

COURSE TIMES

Period 1:  10:00 to 11:15 a.m.
Period 2:  11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Period 3:  1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.

January 11, 18, 25 and February 1

TLC PRICING

$60 per person

No additional viewer discount

TLC Cheat Sheet


INSTRUCTIONS

Use the filters to view Courses by period, instructor, type, etc.  To register, click the Course Title and add the course to the Cart.  Your cost will be computed, based on the number of courses you selected.

View all Courses on a single page (pdf)

View the Course Descriptions & Instructors (pdf)


SESSION DATES

Session 1 – Tuesdays: March 2 – April 6
Session 2 – Tuesdays: April 13 – May 18

Period 1:  10:00 to 11:15 a.m.
Period 2:  11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. .
Period 3:  1:30 to 2:45 p.m.
Period 4:  4:00 to 5:15 p.m. (Session 1 only)
Period 5:  7:00 to 8:15 p.m. (Session 2 only)


TLC PRICING

$200 for 3 courses
$260 for 4 courses
$315 for 5 courses
$370 for 6 courses
$400 for 7 courses
$425 for 8 courses

$100 for an additional viewer


view the FAQs

view the Website Help

visit the Contact page

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Session & Number of Courses

Instructor

Click the Register button when viewing courses to sign up for the Winter 2022 Session.  You'll be directed to the Checkout page where you can complete your registration.

Returning Students:

Please remember to log into your TLC Account when you Register!

TLC Cheat Sheet


INSTRUCTIONS

Use the filters to view Courses by period, instructor, type, etc.  To register, click the Register button in the Course detail or wherever you see it on the page. You'll be directed to the CHeckout page to complete your Registration.  Your cost is $60 per student. An additional zoom viewer is $25.

View all Courses on a single page (pdf)

View the Course Descriptions & Instructors (pdf)


SUMMER 2021 SESSION DATES

Tuesdays: June 8 – June 29

Period 1:  10:00 to 11:15 a.m.
Period 2:  11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. .
Period 3:  1:30 to 2:45 p.m.


TLC PRICING

$60 per student

$25 for an additional viewer


view the FAQs

view Website Help

visit the Contact page

- Filters -

Session & Number of Courses

Instructor

24 Hours of Reality: Protect Our Planet, Protect Ourselves
Instructor: Susanne Kernan

This class is about Climate Change, (aka climate disruption), with a brief primer on what is happening now and how critically important it is to take immediate action, individually and collectively. Suzanne is a trained and certified Climate Reality Leader™.


A Few More Math Nibbles
Instructor: Marc Wantuch

Clever people like you know that, though voted the most-hated school subject, Mathematics hides many delights. Take Fibonacci’s sequence – lotsa fun – but invented a thousand year before he was born. I’ll explain why I love that guy and why you should, too.Why does 12 pm never happen? Why wear a digital watch? They’re very misleading. Right angles are so perfectly natural, but DON’T call them 90 degrees! Why do we begin with addition when multiplication is so much more basic? (Hint: it has something to do with comparing apples to oranges.) And so on!


A Vital Movement™ Workshop for Our Time
Instructor: Judith Rose

The times are calling upon us to be patient, adaptive, creative, and congruent as we face the chronic uncertainties and collective trauma of this epic moment in history. Join Judith Rose, the founder of Vital Movement™, for a unique movement journey, and return to the land of your body and soul. Our session will be a dynamic and fluid ritual designed to encourage healing and renewal through releasing embodied trauma and stress. You will need a cleared space, comfortable clothing, a sturdy armless chair, and a willing heart.


A Whirlwind Tour of Positive Psychology: The Science of Human Flourishing
Instructor: Debra Levin

Positive Psychology is the science of human flourishing. It is a recent outgrowth of the field of psychology that explores science-based tools that facilitate happiness. In this one-session Zoom introductory class, we will take a whirlwind tour of techniques that facilitate uplift: meditation, appreciative inquiry, practicing gratitude, using character strengths, and focusing on meaning and purpose.


Bridging the Divide: Talking to People with Whom We Do Not Agree
Instructor: Dr. Duncan Rogers Lee II

If you use Facebook or other social media, if you attend School Board or Town Board meetings or read about them, then you have witnessed disagreeable people behaving disagreeably. While you cannot effectively change such people, you can change the nature of your interaction with them and this can lead to the beginning of learning to disagree without being disagreeable. This class will focus on techniques of dealing with people who are your polar opposites.


Can Technology Solve Global Warming?
Instructor: Dr. Alan J. Pierce

We will look at technology that might ameliorate some of the effects of global warming. The big question is, of course, will humans be part of the next extinction if global warming is not brought under control? In this session Dr. Pierce’s teaching style will be that of a discussion leader rather than that of a professorial lecturer. As a member of this class, your thoughts on the subject will be most important.


Community, Culture and Politics: a Path Back to Community
Instructor: Susanne Kernan

This class is about the social breakdown of trust in institutions large and small (from school districts to Congress), in a time of increasing cultural and political polarization. We’ll be asking ourselves, how did we get here, and is there a way back? We will briefly look at three examples of successful community-building that overcame political and/or cultural polarization in the US and UK, and discuss how or if these techniques could be applied here to rebuild trust and a sense of community engagement on the local level in Rockland County and on the state and national level politically.


Contemporary Populisms
Instructor: Prof. Akeel Bilgrami

The class will take up the question of what, if anything, is common to a range of different populisms in our time (Trump in the USA, Brexit in the UK, Narendra Modi in India, Le Pen in France, Bolsanaro in Brazil, and Erdogan in Turkey.) Though there will be some effort at giving some historical depth to the issues around populism, the focus will be on the urgent issues it raises in the present. In particular, how does populism differ from democracy and what relation does it bear to capitalism in its current neo-liberal form?


Cornelius Vanderbilt: The First Tycoon
Instructor: Rick Feingold

Cornelius Vanderbilt began operating his own ferry in New York Harbor at the age of 16. He would work from dawn until dark ferrying passengers between Staten Island and the tip of Manhattan. The tiny business would grow into a massive steamship company. Vanderbilt would undercut his competitors by pricing his services so low that he would drive them out of business. Eventually, he built a railroad empire from New York to Chicago and the First Grand Central Station at 42nd Street.


Dealing with Passwords
Instructor: Vincent Cina

This is part two of a two-part presentation on passwords. It will cover the reduction of password frustrations while at the same time practicing “safe computing”. Topics will include: Password Managers, Multi-Factor Authentication, One Time Passwords, and Authenticators.


Discussion of the Film Passing, Directed by Rebecca Hall
Instructor: Robin F. Brancato

Please watch in advance of the class the film Passing, available on Netflix beginning Nov. 10, 2021. This recently released black-and-white movie, based on a 1929 novel by Nellie Larsen, involves two friends from childhood for whom secrets unfold when they unexpectedly meet again as adults.


Feminine Musique – The Life and Times of Pauline García-Viardot
Instructor: Tammy Hensrud and Korliss Uecker

Pauline Garcia-Viardot (1821-1910), of Spanish descent, was a leading nineteenth-century French mezzo-soprano, pedagogue, and composer. Her music will be performed by female music specialists Feminine Musique. Pauline’s music will be interspersed with fascinating details about her life and the lives of musicians, writers, and artists in her inner circle – Chopin, George Sand, Delacroix, Liszt, and Brahms


Frederic Edwin Church: Painter of the World
Instructor: Suzanne Altman

Frederic Church was a vital figure in the movement in American painting known as the Hudson River School and in the development of Western landscape painting in general. Thomas Cole’s paintings made the Hudson River Valley famous, but Frederic Edwin Church was famous for painting the world. Church’s artistic explorations took him to exotic and remote locations, from the Arctic Circle to the Andes to the Middle East. His work had a great influence on many later painters. His home, “Olana,” is a spectacular landmark in the Hudson Valley.


Gandhi’s Moral and Political Philosophy
Instructor: Prof. Akeel Bilgrami

Gandhi was a curious combination of a radical and an anti-modernist. This class will try to bring out how that was a consistent combination of stances. We will consider his ideas of non-violence, the state, the nature of science, and his views on liberalism and the cultural and cognitive effects of capitalism.


How to Identify an Art Movement
Instructor: Suzanne Altman

This lecture will help you identify the characteristics that are distinctive to art movements from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. Examples will be shown to illuminate how each era made unique contributions to the span of art history, both expanding on and reacting against what came before.


Indian Religions and Current Politics
Instructor: Muddappa Lokesh

In this class we’ll explore the diversity of peoples practicing within the religious groups of India and see how they’re currently involved in the tensions of their country’s politics which have come into play these years due to globalization.


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 1
Instructor: Dr. Leonard (Lenny) Grob

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 2
Instructor: Dr. Leonard (Lenny) Grob

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Israel and Palestine: Thoughts on Healing the Divide Week 3
Instructor: Dr. Leonard (Lenny) Grob

This course is a condensed version of the closed-out course by the same name given by Dr. Grob during the fall 2021 semester. It will explore bridging ideas for resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will thus give less attention to the past and more to the future. Although references to historical events will necessarily be made, the course will focus on ideas that might, at some future time, bridge the large gaps between traditional positions taken by the two peoples. Topics include: the role of Holocaust memory in the conflict; borders and security; future of Jerusalem; Palestinian refugee question; potential for confederation; and negotiated peace/long-term reconciliation. (This will be a continuing topic over the three classes. You are free to attend any or all of the sessions.)


Joy through Improvisation
Instructor: Adam Sietz

Add joy to your life through “Improv.” Stretch your mind by opening up the dusty files of your imagination. This improvisation series, with all new situations, provides an enjoyable brain workout through games, exercises, and imaginary play. The results are humor, fun, and a sharpened mind.


Lower Manhattan
Instructor: Martin Schneit

Marty will discuss the history of Lower Manhattan with the architecture, people, and events concerning Trinity Church, Federal Hall, The New York Stock Exchange, sites associated with 18th century slave uprisings, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington.


Memoirs of a Sculptor
Instructor: Dr. Carl Rattner

Using PowerPoint imagery, this talk will endeavor to explain Carl’s life’s work as a sculptor: how it began and evolved; the people, places, and things that inspired it; what it is about and how it is made.


Mindful Chair Yoga
Instructor: Bette Willins

This chair-based yoga class is appropriate for all ages and levels of ability. Instruction incorporates yoga postures, gentle movement sequences, breathwork, and guided meditation, all of which focus on bringing an increased sense of mindful awareness. Research demonstrates that mindful practice of breath and body are effective in managing stress and quieting the nervous system. This class will meet you where you are at any given moment. All are welcome. No yoga experience necessary.


More “Modernism”
Instructor: Alice Twombly

This will be a short story that we didn’t get to read in the fall, namely F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz”. Look for the pdf link and download.


Musicians of Color in the Concert Hall – Session 2
Instructor: Richard Markowitz

Richard is presenting a two-session course that considers the lives and careers of musicians of color. In the first session, we will consider composers, conductors, and instrumentalists. The second will be concerned with vocal recitalists and operatic singers. Figures to be profiled will include, among others, William Grant Still, Henry Burleigh, Dean Dixon, Roland Hayes, Marian Anderson, and Kenneth Spencer. The enduring racism which played a part in the careers of many musicians of great talent and the ways in which it was handled and overcome, will be examined in detail.


My Adoption Triangle
Instructor: Dr. Nancy Taylor Goldman

This three-week course will tell the compelling story of the author who was adopted at birth into a nurturing family, who lost her mother to cancer at twenty, and then reunited with her birth mother at fifty with the help of information given to her earlier in life by her mother. It is also the story of adoption itself, viewed as a triangular relationship, exploring the three perspectives of the birth mother, the mother, and the adopted person.


My Adoption Triangle Week 3
Instructor: Dr. Nancy Taylor Goldman

This three-week course will tell the compelling story of the author who was adopted at birth into a nurturing family, who lost her mother to cancer at twenty, and then reunited with her birth mother at fifty with the help of information given to her earlier in life by her mother. It is also the story of adoption itself, viewed as a triangular relationship, exploring the three perspectives of the birth mother, the mother, and the adopted person.


My Adoption Triangle Week 2
Instructor: Dr. Nancy Taylor Goldman

This three-week course will tell the compelling story of the author who was adopted at birth into a nurturing family, who lost her mother to cancer at twenty, and then reunited with her birth mother at fifty with the help of information given to her earlier in life by her mother. It is also the story of adoption itself, viewed as a triangular relationship, exploring the three perspectives of the birth mother, the mother, and the adopted person.


Poetry Rx
Instructor: Phyllis Citrin

This course will feature selected readings from the book by the same title by Norman E. Rosenthal, MD. We will share poems that may provide emotional and physical healing through nature and our mind/body connection. Analysis and sharing by students, along with the deep analysis by this perceptive psychiatrist, will hopefully bring us collectively to the healing, comfort and inspiration which is the purpose of this book.


Propaganda Music and Film of World War II
Instructor: Rick Feingold

The Allies utilized films, music, posters, cartoons, and even comic books in a propaganda effort to increase support for the war effort in America and abroad. President Franklin Roosevelt created the Office of War Information in 1942 to control all communications coming into and out of the United States. This program features the Three Stooges short You Natzy Spy! and the German propaganda band Charlie and His Orchestra.


Recent News in Science
Instructor: Dr. Marty O. Cohen

Every day, new and exciting discoveries and developments in the various fields of science are announced. In this class, the prior few weeks’ most important scientific news items will be presented and discussed. Participation by class members is encouraged.


Rene Magritte and his Thought-Provoking Paintings
Instructor: Sandra Martin

This Belgian surrealist will amuse you, confuse you, and delight you with his images of everyday objects and people in unusual spaces. Let’s look at these paintings and see how challenging it is for us to interpret them.


Sinatra’s Radio Days as a Big Band Vocalist and Soloist
Instructor: Dr. Floyd Lapp

Hear Frank Sinatra’s debut with the Hoboken Four (1935) and big band remotes with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey (1939-1942), and as a soloist through the 1940s on a multiple of radio programs including, Your Hit Parade. This archival material represents a special period for the American Song Book and the evolution of Sinatra’s musical career as “The Voice” of 20th century popular music.


Still More “Modernism”
Instructor: Alice Twombly

This will be another short story that we didn’t get to read in the fall, namely Ernest Hemingway’s “Now I Lay Me”. Look for pdf link or look for Hemingway short story collections on line or in the library.


The Fabulous First Chapter of “Deacon King Kong” by James McBride
Instructor: Susan Barnett

When reading or re-reading the opening of this award-winning novel, we enter a world described through a satiric lens. We will examine and discuss the ways in which the author uses the brilliant devices of comedy to show us people and places as we have not seen them before. Have the book with you for the class.


The Girl from Ipanema and the Music of Antonio Carlos Jobim
Instructor: Rick Feingold

The Bossa Nova sound originated in Rio de Janeiro, home to the Copacabana and Ipanema beaches. The Girl from Ipanema won a Grammy for Record of the Year in 1965. Rio, a city of contrasts, features one of the seven wonders of the modern world, the pre-Lenten celebration Carnival, and striking favelas. The city comes alive through the music of Antonio Carlos Jobim, including the Sinatra recordings, Sergio Mendes, and Elis Regina.


The Opera Experience: Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers
Instructor: Joan Adinolfi Mallory

The Opera Experience is an interactive class where students learn the story and background of a particular opera. They also listen to the signature arias, “meet” the composer, and even participate in some of the drama. This time we will examine Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers.


The Quirky English Language
Instructor: Dr. Marty O. Cohen

English is the unchallenged present day international language. It is the most widely used language in commerce, on the Internet, and in the field of entertainment. However, it is also highly quirky, which makes it unique among languages. In this class we will look at, and hopefully enjoy, many of these quirks.


The Radio Plays of Norman Corwin
Instructor: Richard Markowitz

In the heyday of network radio broadcasting and after, Norman Corwin became celebrated as the poet laureate of radio. During a career that spanned more than five decades, he wrote and directed award winning audio plays which examined a wide range of themes dealing with the human condition. Humorous, satirical, whimsical, dramatic, poignant – the tone and form varied. We will sample a
cross section of scenes from vintage broadcasts, featuring great actors such as James Stewart, Burgess Meredith, Orson Welles, and Ruth Gordon among many others. We will also hear the author, himself, speaking about the creative process and his life. To follow along, you may request texts in advance. Forward your email address to Richard at thinkers.liu@gmail.com and he will email the texts to you before class.


Trim Tab People: Little-Known Individuals Who Have Impacted the World
Instructor: Jim Evers

A trim tab is a small rudder that turns a larger one. Many of the world’s improvements have come from individuals we probably have not heard of, but their stories make for interesting learning. Find out who changed the course of World War II. Who was the wealthiest female CEO in 2013? What MD never practiced, but became a world leading entrepreneur in medicine and other fields. Who invented a first aid product used around the world daily? You’ll hear these and other fascinating stories.


Understanding Passwords
Instructor: Vincent Cina

This is part one of a two-part presentation on passwords. We will explore these questions: Why do we have passwords? How do bad actors (cyber criminals) steal our passwords? What are the characteristics of a good (i.e., secure) password? Vincent will share his experiences helping people deal with their password pain.


What Did You Say? Everyday Communication Strategies for the Whole Family
Instructor: Sophia Patrikas

Are you frustrated or embarrassed due to difficulties hearing and communicating? Join us as we host an informational session about how one hears, communication strategies, and group problem solving surrounding communication breakdowns. Gain insight and strategies from our audiology staff and the experiences of others who may struggle in similar ways.


Why I Do Not Fear Artificial Intelligence, but Have Concerns about It and Want to be Ready
Instructor: Jim Evers

Media often report warnings about AI. They come from scientists, world and corporate leaders, employees, historians, and others. Having followed popular media and the professional media about AI, Jim respects these warnings, but he also respects the excitement and promises AI offers. How to get ready? You will learn suggestions for what we all need to do as AI takes over more and more of out human tasks, including decisions